first_imgFormer Goa Congress chief John Fernandes said here on Wednesday that ailing Congress president Sonia Gandhi was helping Prime Minister Narendra Modi achieve his ambition of a Congress-mukt Bharat by not handing over the reins to her son and party vice-president, Rahul Gandhi. Mr. Fernandes suggested that Ms. Gandhi should give Mr. Gandhi the overall charge of the party as soon as possible. Mr. Fernandes said, “If Ms. Gandhi is sick, then she should not make the Congress also sick. She should not also help Narendra Modi in realising his objective of achieving a Congress-mukt Bharat.”Mr. Fernandes, a former Rajya Sabha MP and Pradesh Congress president in Goa, questioned the Congress high command for not holding a session of the All India Congress Committee for three years since its defeat in the 2014 general elections. ‘Time to bounce back’He said, “The Congress can bounce back, if there are dedicated workers like me. We will work together and the Congress will make a comeback. The Goa election results were an indicator that the people of the State want the Congress back.” In 2014, Luizinho Faleiro replaced Mr. Fernandes as Goa Pradesh Congress President.last_img read more

first_imgAfter media reports last week on “rats having guzzled lakhs of litres of alcohol seized and stored at Bihar police stations”, the administration on Tuesday decided to do something a little stronger.On Tuesday, 17,586 Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) bottles worth about ₹90 lakh seized from across Patna district were destroyed at an Excise Department godown at Khagaul, located on the outskirts of Patna.A road roller crushed the bottles in front of Patna District Magistrate Sanjay Agrawal.“We destroyed the seized bottles after completing court formalities. The process will continue in future too,” Mr. Agrawal told journalists.In the neighbouring Nalanda district too, 4,172-litre of liquor bottles worth ₹75 lakh were destroyed by a road roller at Chandi Police station. Nalanda police had sought permission from the Magistrate to destroy liquor bottles seized in connection with 24 cases. Huge quantities of illegal alcohol bottles were confiscated from Nalanda districts during the past year. Nalanda Superintendent of Police Kumar Ashish said: “The process will continue in future as well.”Since Bihar was declared a dry State in April 2016, over 8-lakh litre of alcohol was seized and stacked in maalkhanas at police stations in all 38 districts. The seized products include 5-lakh litre of IMFL and 3-lakh litre of country-made liquor.Illegal consignmentsAccording to official records, most illegal consignments seized under the stringent Bihar Prohibition and Excise Act, 2016, had come from Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand and West Bengal. Despite senior officers claiming they hadn’t received reports from police stations regarding “tippler rats”, the government had asked the District Magistrates to destroy the seized bottles in their respective districts.“Following court formalities, the District Magistrates started destroying the seized liquor bottles. The process will pick up momentum in the days to come…We’ll destroy all the seized liquor bottles,” a senior officer told The Hindu, adding “na rahega baans, na bajegi baansuri [no one will be blamed when there’s no liquor left]”.At a meeting with Patna Senior Superintendent of Police Manu Maharaj on May 2, the in-charge of some of police stations had reportedly informed him that rodents were consuming liquor stocked at various maalkhanas.last_img read more

first_imgSlamming political parties for raising the issue of Ram Temple before elections and then forgetting it later, delegates at the All-India Hindu Convention here on Friday appealed to Hindus to unite in their demand for a Ram Mandir at Ayodhya and ensure that it became a reality. Addressing a session on ‘Task against evil tendencies in the Government’ on the third day of the convention here, T. Raja Singh, BJP MLA of Hyderabad (Telangana) and founder of Shriram Yuva Sena said, “The time has come to firmly say the first priority is Hindu Dharma, and then politics.’’State chief of Shiv Sena from Telangana T.N. Murari said “The ruling Telangana Rashtra Samiti is implementing a policy of appeasement of the minorities and injustice on majority Hindus.”‘Democracy’s failure’Quoting Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar, Ramesh Shinde, national spokesperson of Hindu Janajagran Samiti said however good the Constitution might be, if the rulers were incompetent, democracy will be a failure. “As many Members of Parliament today are corrupt and are criminals, the failure of democracy has surfaced within 70 years only. To change the system in a democracy, the society cannot afford to remain indifferent, but take the lead and take action in a democratic way,” he said. “An expansive fight have to be organised against evil tendencies by utilising legal ways such as protests, PILs, use of RTI Act etc. This fight itself will be a movement in the direction of establishing an ideal system of a Hindu nation,” he added.last_img read more

first_img The party has been scheduling meetings to discuss the issue, including one held on Tuesday afternoon. Sources said security concerns also influenced the party’s line. “As a rule, we favour small States; it was under the Vajpayee government that Jharkhand, Uttarakhand and Chhattisgarh were created. Darjeeling, however, is too tiny to become a separate State, and it shares the border with Nepal,” a senior office-bearer said.BJP prospects in StateThe BJP won the Darjeeling Lok Sabha seat in 2014 (Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs S.S. Ahluwalia is the member from Darjeeling), and it has been aggressive in its plan to expand in the rest of West Bengal. The agitation led by the Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) has found the party wrong-footed. Hence, support for the Statehood demand may affect the party’s position in the rest of the State. GJM supporters intensify protests Kailash Vijayvargiya, BJP general secretary in charge of West Bengal, said on Tuesday that the party did not favour a separate Gorkhaland.“The BJP is not in favour of a Gorkha State, but we do want the issue raised by those demanding a separate State — protection of their culture and identity — be addressed,” Mr. Vijaywargiya said. “We believe that successive governments in West Bengal did not empower the Gorkhaland Territorial Administration (GTA) enough to address the genuine grievances of the people. The GTA was set up in 1988 after an agitation. The people had expectations. When that didn’t happen, the agitation started again,” he said. “We want the State government to address all issues, and any solution has to come from the State.”Also Readlast_img read more

first_imgPANAJI: All India Congress Committee secretary Girish Chodankar, the Congress candidate for the Panaji by-election, on Sunday launched a scathing attack on Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar, against whom he is contesting the bypoll. Starting his election campaign in front of an offshore casino that has run aground at Miramar beach, Mr. Chodankar said Mr. Parrikar had betrayed the defence interests of the country by returning to Goa to form a government, despite tensions at the country’s borders. “Mr. Parrikar and the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) have betrayed the nation, despite speaking about nationalism and nation first. When they want to form a government, they run down to Goa by leaving sensitive ministries like the Defence Ministry in doldrums. For them, love for country is secondary to love for power, the same power from which they had been ousted in Goa in the Assembly election,” Mr. Chodankar said. “Our national leaders have ordered us to expose Mr. Parrikar, who as former Defence Minister came back to Goa to eat Goan food while the country was reeling under the Kashmir crisis, where soldiers were being killed,” he told reporters. The AICC secretary said Congress president Sonia Gandhi and vice-president Rahul Gandhi had encouraged him to expose the duplicity of the nationalism “being sold” by the BJP. He also pointed to the sixth proposed offshore casino vessel, which has run aground at Miramar beach, and said the casino industry was backed by the BJP leadership, and would lead the State to doom.last_img read more

first_imgPolice personnel in the Ganjam and Berhampur police districts in Odisha will have to avail five compulsory days off every year to ease their professional stress and strain. They are now required to take leave on the days of their wedding anniversary, and the birthdays of their self, spouse and two children. This compulsory leave with pay is meant to enable police personnel to spend quality time with their family. Such an initiative has been taken up in Odisha for the first time by Ashis Singh, the Superintendent of Police (SP) who is in charge of both these police districts. A circular to this effect has has been already issued in the Berhampur police district. A similar circular will be issued for the Ganjam police district on August 15, Mr. Singh said.Speaking to The Hindu, Mr. Singh said that this was a small measure to acknowledge the toil of police personnel even on holidays and festivals, when all other citizens enjoy life with their families. Usually, police personnel face complaints and critical remarks from their children and wives instead. “I felt police personnel and their family, who sacrifice their own enjoyment for safety and security of society, should also get chance to enjoy some time together,” said Mr. Singh.The administration of both these police districts is also thinking of providing gifts and messages of goodwill on these special days. A data base of marriage anniversaries and birthdays of police personnel and their family members is being prepared in both districts.last_img read more

first_imgIf the BJP’s hoardings welcoming Amit Shah here are any indication, West Bengal will see a “different” party president when he arrives here on Monday.The publicity materials have an aggressive tone, unlike in the past, and identify Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee as a jamati (“one attached to Muslim organisations”) and a jehadi (“warrior of Islam”). They feature a smiling Mr. Shah, along with BJP State unit president Dilip Ghosh.The roads from the airport to the BJP office in central Kolkata are full of hoardings featuring Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Bharatiya Jana Sangh (BJS) founder Syama Prasad Mookerjee and BJS stalwart Deendayal Upadhyay.“The tone of the hoardings has never been so aggressive during Mr. Shah’s earlier visits to the city, and we expect him to give a strong message to the [State BJP] leaders,” a State-level party official said. In earlier meetings, even those before the Assembly elections in 2017, Mr. Shah showed restraint in targeting Ms. Banerjee, demoralising BJP workers. “But it would be different from now on, we are told,” the official said.Day-long meetingMr. Shah will hold a day-long meeting of the BJP’s office-bearers, along with the district presidents. One of the key issues that he is expected to address is the setting up of booth-level committees for the panchayat and Lok Sabha elections.The State has over 77,000 polling booths and the State leadership was given a target of reaching as many of them as possible and setting up committees to monitor and man those booths during the elections. The BJP State unit has allegedly failed to reach more than “18,000 booths”, another office-bearer said.“Actually, we have had committees in not more than 12,000 booths and 18,000 is an overestimate,” the office-bearer said. Mr. Shah will seek a clarification from the State leadership why the leadership could not set up teams in more booths as a part of the BJP’s Bistarak Yojana (expansion drive) launched in the first week of June.“To be honest, it was too short a time. Besides, the Trinamool Congress cadres are threatening us at every stage,” the BJP official said. However, the excuses are ostensibly not acceptable to the national leadership, and prior to Mr. Shah’s visit, national observer Kailash Vijayvargiya snubbed the top State leadership. “They were basically questioned about the lack of penetration among the city’s intellectuals and the failure to reach more booths,” the official said.Mr. Shah has a series of other programmes lined up in the city, including a meeting with the city’s intellectuals. “However, it is not clear how many of the city’s intellectuals could be reached and invited [and] Mr. Vijayvargiya got upset,” the official said. Mr. Shah is expected to meet them on September 12 and discuss the depth of misunderstandings among various factions of the State BJP.last_img read more

first_imgThe Congress on Wednesday swept the local body by-elections held in 21 districts of Rajasthan for selecting the members of zila parishads, panchayat samitis and municipalities. The Opposition party registered an impressive victory in all the three local bodies for which polling was held on Tuesday.Of the six zila parishad seats where bypolls were held, the Congress won four, while the party registered a victory in 12 of the 20 panchayat samitis which went to bypolls. Congress candidates were declared elected in four of the six urban local bodies of municipalities.Independents winThe ruling BJP won one zila parishad seat, eight panchayat samiti seats and two municipality seats. Independent candidates were declared elected on one seat each in zila parishads and panchayat samitis.The Congress won all the three local body seats in Bikaner district and also registered victories in Bhilwara, Karauli, Dungarpur, Ajmer, Jhunjhunu, Churu and Sirohi districts where it routed the BJP. The BJP candidates won mainly in Dholpur district.The local body bypolls were held in the State about a month after the by-elections in the Mandalgarh Assembly and the Alwar and Ajmer Lok Sabha constituencies. The Congress had wrested all the three seats from the BJP and its candidates had won by a huge margin, with the party claiming that it was a people’s verdict against the Vasundhara Raje government’s “failure and arrogance”.With the resurgent Congress posing a serious challenge to the BJP, Pradesh Congress president Sachin Pilot said his party had “comprehensively routed” BJP in a clear indication that the people were fed up with the misrule in which “every section of the society was [being] exploited”.Responsible OppositionMr. Pilot said the Congress had played its role as a responsible Opposition party by ensuring its presence among the people and maintaining a dialogue with different sections, which had led to an increase in its vote percentage in all elections held during the last four years.last_img read more

first_imgDo trees yield gold and silver? Does the first aid kit include a spade and a car jack?The answer to both questions is yes, if textbooks issued by the Meghalaya Board of Secondary Education (MBoSE) are to be believed.Under pressure from academics, NGOs and parents, Meghalaya’s Department of Education has undertaken an exercise to correct errors in its books. The State’s Education Minister, Lakhmen Rymbui, has directed officials to provide him with copies after marking the errors.Corrective measures“Corrective measures will be taken so that students do not suffer. We will look into every aspect of publishing so that error-free textbooks can be provided,” said Mr. Rymbui.Apart from spelling and grammatical errors, factual mistakes on the culture and tradition of indigenous communities, primarily the Khasis, in the textbooks, had rubbed several organisations the wrong way.For instance, the Class IX Social Science book says: “The Khasi and Pnars are very good in carving. They have their own style of making gold and silver from the tree.”The book also refers to legendary Garo freedom fighter Togan Sangma as a Jaintia, and omits Captain Williamson A. Sangma, the first Chief Minister of Meghalaya, from a list of ‘prominent personalities of Meghalaya’.Similarly, in the Class X textbook on health and physical education, a diagram shows a spade, a flash light, a car jack and other car accessories as part of a first aid kit.The Class VIII book on Social Science, too, has a few errors. Aiborlang Nongsiej, a Shillong resident, pointed out that a column on the ‘Preamble to the Constitution in India’ has the word ‘brief’ instead of ‘belief’.Overpricing tooIf these were not enough, some schools adhering to the State Board have been accused of selling overpriced textbooks instead of the cheaper ones issued by the MBoSE.The youth wing of the Khun Hynniewtrep National Awakening Movement, a political party, accused a missionary school in the State capital Shillong of making students purchase an environmental education book for ₹225 each.“The same book issued by the MBoSE costs ₹70,” the youth wing’s president Thomas Passah told reporters.Mr. Rymbui said the Board would be streamlined after the government appoints an “efficient, full-time” Executive Chairman for the MBoSE.The Board has not had an Executive Chairman for almost three years now, he said.last_img read more

first_imgTaking their new-found friendship ahead, the Samajwadi Party on Wednesday decided to extend support to a BSP candidate in the upcoming Legislative Council polls while fielding its own candidate on the other seat.‘The Samajwadi Party will field its candidate on one seat while extending support to the BSP on the other seat for the Legislative Council,” SP spokesman Rajendra Chaudhary said.The election to 13 seats of the Council will be held on April 26 and the counting of votes will take place the same day.To ensure victory, a candidate needs 29 first-preference votes and arithmetically, the BJP and its allies are likely to win 11 out of 13 seats comfortably and still be left with five additional votes while the Opposition parties can get only two seats.In the 100-member U.P. Legislative Council, the BJP has just 13 members. The Samajwadi Party has 61 members, the BSP nine, the Congress two, the RLD one and others 12.Asked whether this decision was taken to compensate for the BSP support in the recent Lok Sabha bypolls in Gorakhpur and Phulpur which the SP wrested from the BJP, Mr. Chaudhary said: “Despite all efforts by our party, the BSP could not win the Rajya Sabha election because of the BJP’s gimmicks. The SP wants to ensure that one candidate of the BSP reaches the Legislative Council.”The SP-BSP combine struck gold in the ‘saffron’ bastion of Gorakhpur, associated with Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath, and Phulpur, earlier represented by his deputy Keshav Prasad Maurya in the bypolls.The tenures of 13 MLCs, including SP national president Akhilesh Yadav and two Ministers in the Yogi Adityanath government — Mahendra Kumar Singh and Mohsin Raza — will end on May 5.Of the 13 seats falling vacant, seven are held by the SP, two each by the BJP and the BSP, and one by the RLD. The 13th seat is held by former SP minister Ambika Chaudhary. His seat fell vacant after he switched over from the SP to the BSP.Though the BJP and its allies have 324 MLAs in the 403-member State Assembly, it may not get the required strength in the Upper House to get Bills passed even after winning 11 of the 13 seats.During the winter session of the State legislature last year, the Aditynanath government had failed to ensure the passage of the Uttar Pradesh Control of Organised Crime Bill in the Upper House.last_img read more

first_imgHome Minister Rajnath Singh has strongly defended the Modi government’s Kashmir policy, saying the Kashmir issue has been a “very old” one and a major challenge for all governments and will take time to be resolved. He also said the BJP “did its best” and tried everything to bring peace and development to the valley. Mr. Singh made these comments in an interview to ‘The Week’ magazine following the BJP’s decision on Tuesday to withdraw its support to the PDP-led government. Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti had resigned subsequently and the state was today brought under the governor’s rule. “No, Modiji’s Kashmir policy is correct. There is no doubt about it. It will take time; as I said, the problem was not born today or yesterday,” the Home Minister said when asked whether Mr. Modi’s Kashmir policy was faltering. On whether he missed former state chief minister and PDP patron Mufti Mohammad Sayeed, Mr. Singh said the late leader was a senior and mature politician.“But, we should not draw comparisons. She (Mehbooba Mufti) also tried, but it can be a matter of assessment of how successful she has been. The Kashmir problem is a very old one and has been a major challenge for all governments,” he said. He said “a major factor has been the challenge of Pakistan-sponsored terrorism”.Asked if he considered the ceasefire a mistake as it turned out to be the bloodiest Eid in the valley in recent years, he said it was not true that big attacks had not happened on Eid in the past. “I don’t think that the ceasefire was a mistake. It was a decision that was taken keeping in mind those people in Kashmir who wanted peace and wanted to celebrate the pious month of Ramzan in its true spirit,” he said. He added that security forces were never stopped from neutralising the terrorists, who were infiltrating from Pakistan, and the government did not call it a ceasefire. It was suspension of operations for a month, he said. Mr. Singh reiterated the government’s stand that it will talk to whoever is willing to talk to it. “We will even talk to Pakistan if it wants to talk to us. But Pakistan should first address the problem of terrorism emanating from its soil,” he said. To a question about Pakistan elections and speculation that cricketer-turned-politician Imran Khan can form the government, Mr. Singh said,”Yes, the Pakistan army is at it (supporting Imran Khan)”.last_img read more

first_imgAs the strike by Haryana Roadways employees entered the 16th day on Wednesday, State Congress leaders met Governor Satyadev Narayan Arya and sought his intervention to resolve the crises.A delegation of Congress leaders led by former Chief Minister Bhupinder Singh Hooda, which submitted a memorandum to the Governor, alleged that the rigid attitude of the ruling BJP government had resulted in a crises-like situation because of which people of the State were suffering.“The ongoing strike by Haryana Roadways employees, which is being supported by employees of other government departments, has brought most of the government work to a standstill. Routine life has been badly hit and people are suffering,” said Mr. Hooda“The State government should immediately withdraw its decision to award permits to 720 private buses to ensure that the agitation comes to an end and life returns to normal at the earliest,” added Mr. Hooda.Mr. Hooda alleged that the BJP was adamant on its decision as it wanted to extend benefits to certain people. “An independent probe into this would reveal a scam running into hundreds of crores,” he alleged.Bid to block roadMeanwhile, at Bhuna town in Fatehabad and in Bhiwani, police resorted to lathi charge to disperse protesting workers of various government departments, including Roadways employees, after they attempted to block the road which Chief Minister Manohar Lal Khattar was to take.Bhuna police station SHO Ramesh Kumar said the protesters tried to block the road through which the Chief Minister’s motorcade was to pass. “When the police tried to stop them, they pelted stones,” he said.last_img read more

first_imgPunjab Police on Saturday intensified a search operation it had launched on Friday evening in Pathankot’s Shadipur village after a local farmer claimed to have seen six suspicious men, carrying backpacks, in the area.Pathankot Senior Superintendent of Police Vivek Soni told reporters that besides the ongoing search operation in Shadipur, security has been beefed up in neighbouring areas. “We carried out search operations in at least five villages. However, nothing suspicious has been found yet,” said Mr. Soni.Balbir Singh, the farmer, claimed that he had seen the men when he was working in his fields. “I saw six tall persons who were carrying backpacks. As they were looking unfamiliar, I informed the village sarpanch (head), who later told the police about these suspicious men,” Mr. Singh said.On receiving information from the farmer, the police shared inputs with security agencies to trace the six men.The agencies have already been on alert after four people travelling from Jammu in a hired SUV allegedly snatched the vehicle from its driver at gunpoint on November 13 in Pathankot district’s Madhopur area.No terror angle However, the police on Saturday ruled out a terror angle in the snatching case after the SUV’s driver identified one of the suspects from a photo and he turned out to be a local criminal. “One of them (vehicle snatchers) has been identified. He is a criminal from Jalandhar,” said Punjab’s Director General of Police Suresh Arora. The vehicle has not been traced yet. Pathankot district, which shares an international border with Pakistan, had witnessed a major terror attack at the airbase there in January 2016 when heavily armed terrorists sneaked in from across the border and snatched a Punjab Police officer’s car to get to the military facility. In 2015 as well, a police station in Dinanagar was targeted by terrorists.(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

first_imgThe Assam government on Wednesday rolled out a slew of pro-farmers sops worth ₹1,000 crore annually, but insisted they were not copycat debt relief schemes.Himanta Biswa Sarma, the State’s Finance Minister, announced the introduction of the Assam Farmers’ Credit Subsidy Scheme, the Assam Farmers’ Interest Relief Scheme, and the Assam Farmers’ Incentive Scheme to cover 27 lakh farming households across 26,000 revenue villages serviced by 1,800 rural and semi-urban bank branches.“These are subsidy schemes, not loan or debt waiver schemes and have been in the process after having been included in the State’s Budget for the 2018-19 fiscal. It was incorporated to mark 125 years of the Patharughat peasants’ movement and not copied from Madhya Pradesh or Gujarat or anywhere else,” Mr. Sarma said.Some 140 peasants were killed in police firing on January 28, 1894, at Patharughat in north-central Assam’s Darrang district. The farmers had gathered there to protest arbitrary increase in taxes levied by the British.Under the credit subsidy scheme, launched this year as a pilot project, the government would reimburse 25% of the loan repaid by farmers in their accounts. The cap on reimbursement will be ₹25,000.“This will cover 2.62 lakh farmers who have taken loans through Kisan Credit Card. Those who have repaid the loan fully or partly will be reimbursed, and those who are about to pay will have to pay only 75% of the returnable money,” Mr. Sarma said.The scheme, to cost the government ₹500 crore annually, has been extended to small tea growers and rubber planters too.The interest relief scheme, to cost the government ₹200 crore, intends to make farm loans interest-free. “The Central government provides 3% subsidy on interest on such loans. The Assam government will take care of the remaining 4%, which means we will move towards zero interest on farm loans,” Mr. Sarma said, adding the scheme would be for loans up to ₹2 lakh.The incentive scheme, worth ₹300 crore, targets about 3 lakh farm loan defaulters to bring them back into the banking system. “We will give ₹10,000 to make the NPA (non-performing assets) accounts of farmers active again. We hope this will encourage some 8 lakh more farmers in Assam who have never taken loans,” Mr. Sarma said.Apart from these schemes, the Assam government would be distributing tractors in all revenue villages. Some 7,000 tractors have already been given, the minister said.The government would also be providing ₹5,000 each to 27 lakh farmers as agricultural input subsidy. The scheme will start with 5 lakh farmers who registered for it.last_img read more

first_imgThe Navy abandoned efforts on January 20 to pull out the decomposed body of a miner that it spotted four days ago inside a coal mine in Meghalaya’s East Jaintia Hills District, officials said.The Navy divers had spotted the decomposed body of a trapped miner on Wednesday, using an unmanned, remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) at a depth of around 160 feet inside the mine’s main shaft.At least 15 miners are trapped inside the mine since December 13 last year after one of them accidentally punctured the wall of the mine, leading to its flooding.“The Navy today suspended the pulling of the remains, which they had been trying since yesterday evening, as too much disintegration (of the body) took place with every pull by the ROV jaw,” operation spokesperson R. Susngi said.  The families of four of the 15 miners had on January 19 urged the rescuers to retrieve the decomposed body so that they could perform the last rites.No water reductionA multi-agency operation, which included de-watering of the main shaft where the miners are trapped, and of the nearby mines, has failed to yield any result as the water level has not gone down.The Navy divers were awaiting further instructions from the government, Mr. Susngi said.The family members of the victims from Garo Hills have also been summoned to the site to help identify the body from the video shot underwater by the ROV earlier this week.An ROV operator from Chennai went on with a search operation in the nearby mines and the Coal India continued de-watering in the two nearby abandoned shafts by running their pumps for 23 hours since Saturday evening, Mr. Susngi said. In the last 46 hours, Coal India had pumped out over 52 lakh litres of water from the mines, but it was not enough to bring down the water level, he said.Meanwhile, the Meghalaya government was likely to apprise the Supreme Court of the problems in continuing with the search-and-rescue operations, an official said.last_img read more

first_imgHoli is ‘played’ in most parts of India. But the festival is ‘sung’ in a part of Assam, where it goes by another name: Doul Utsav.The wellspring of the festival at Barpeta in western Assam is Barpeta Satra, a Vaishnav monastery that Madhabdev established in 1583. Madhabdev was the prime disciple of Srimanta Sankardeva, the saint-reformer who inspired the Bhakti movement in Assam around the time Guru Nanak, Kabir and Chaitanya Mahaprabhu did elsewhere in India.Madhabdev wrote a few Doul songs such as Faku khele karunamoy (The Lord full of compassion plays Holi) and Dolai Gobinda paramanande (Krishna plays Holi blissfully) for ritualistic celebration of the festival.Borrowed from Bengali But the traders of Barpeta, a major commercial centre for centuries, had by then made the common man’s Doul songs popular. The songs they sung in the celebration of colours were influenced by Bengal’s folk music. “Traders those days used to sail on the Brahmaputra to Dhaka and other Bengal ports. They introduced Holi songs borrowed heavily from Bengali. More than a century ago, a group of nationalist poets, writers and musicians began writing Assamese Holi songs. As their music became popular, the Bengali-influenced songs disappeared,” Priya Ranjan Das, a cultural activist in Barpeta, told The Hindu.Poet Ambikagiri Raichoudhury, writer Prasanna Lal Choudhury and musician Purushottam Das played a major role in the linguistic changeover. “Their songs attained great popularity, giving Barpeta two categories of Holi songs — folk and monastic — that people sing while playing with colours,” he said. The folk songs have no place in the Barpeta Satra where the monastic songs accompany rituals that make Doul last three or five days, depending on the Hindu month — Chaitra or Faagun — and planetary positions.last_img read more

first_imgAn alleged victim in the Muzaffarpur shelter home sexual assault case has turned hostile before a Delhi court, sources said on Tuesday. The alleged victim, who is one of the prosecution witnesses in the case, was declared hostile before Additional Sessions Judge Saurabh Kulshreshtha, after she failed to recognise two of the accused, the court sources said. The proceedings are being conducted in-camera. Meanwhile, Advocate Pramod Kumar Dubey, appearing for the key accused, Brajesh Thakur, claimed that the CBI was tutoring the witnesses. The court has recorded the statements of 12 victims, who are also prosecution’s witnesses in the case. On March 30, the court framed various charges, including criminal conspiracy to commit rapeagainst 21 accused and put them on trial. Besides rape and criminal conspiracy, the court also framed charges under various sections of the POCSO (Protection of Children from Sexual Offences) Act. Thakur, a strongman in Muzaffarpur, was charged with serious charges under POCSO Act, including Section 6 (aggravated sexual assault). The offence carries punishment of a minimum 10 years and a maximum of life imprisonment. All 21 accused were charged with criminal conspiracy to commit rape and penetrative sexual assault against minors. The court will hold trial for the offences of rape, sexual assault, sexual harassment, drugging of minors and criminal intimidation among other charges. Thakur and staff of his shelter home as well as Bihar Department of Social Welfare officials were charged with criminal conspiracy, neglect of duty, failure to report assault on the girls.last_img read more

first_imgWe catch new flu viruses from ducks and pigs. And Ebola, the disease that’s got the world worried at the moment, may have originated in bats. Now, a study of microbial DNA isolated from 1000-year-old Peruvian mummies blames seals for spreading tuberculosis (TB) to humans in South America long before European settlers arrived.”This work provides an entirely new vista on the arrival of [TB] in the New World, and also the potential role of sea mammals in the global dissemination of the TB [bacteria],” says Stephen Gordon, a microbiologist at University College Dublin who was not involved in the work. The analysis also indicates that TB as a human disease is much younger than researchers have thought.Even though TB kills more than a million people per year, there’s still much debate about when Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacterium that causes it, first infected humans and how it spread. One early idea was that it’s a relatively young disease that spread from cows to humans in the Stone Age, less than 10,000 years ago. More recently, studies have shown huge diversity in the DNA of TB strains from around the world, and particularly in Africa; that suggests TB arose in humans 100,000 years ago and was spread around the world and into other animals as our ancestors migrated out of Africa, says Johannes Krause, a geneticist from the University of Tübingen in Germany.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)How TB reached the Americas has also been contentious. The M. tuberculosis strains in the Western Hemisphere all look like those from modern Europe, suggesting early explorers brought the disease with them. But several mummies that predate Columbus’s arrival in the New World have the bone changes indicative of TB, suggesting the bacteria arrived before Europeans did.Indeed, medical microbiologist Helen Donoghue of University College London and her colleagues found Mycobacterium DNA in a 17,000-year-old bison fossil from Wyoming more than a decade ago. But others who worked on a different part of the same bone did not turn up any bacterial DNA and called Donoghue’s results into question. Subsequently, organic chemist David Minnikin from the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom discovered telltale fatlike molecules called lipids in the same bone and in other large mammal fossils that belong to Mycobacterium. Minnikin thinks that ancient Americans were infected with TB from eating mastodon, bison, and other large mammals, which may have carried the disease to the Americas over on the land bridge between Siberia and Alaska.In the new study, Krause used DNA sequencing to get to the bottom of these mysteries. He and his colleagues isolated and tested DNA from 68 ancient South American human bones over varying ages showing signs of decay and deformity characteristic of TB. They found DNA from TB bacteria in bones from three different people, confirming the diagnosis; they even pieced together much of the bacterial genome for each.“The paper clearly and convincingly shows that TB was in the Americas prior to [European] contact,” says Ruth Hershberg, an evolutionary microbial genomics researcher at the Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, who was not involved with the work.Krause and his colleagues compared the three ancient American genomes with a Mycobacterium genome isolated from a 200-year-old Hungarian mummy and the genomes of modern TB bacteria, both from humans and from more than 250 other species. From these data, they estimated the mutation rate in the bacteria, which allowed them to determine that the last common ancestor of all human strains lived 5000 to 6000 years ago, they report online today in Nature. “We can now show the mutation rate is about 10x faster” than previously proposed, Krause says.To learn how TB got to the Americas, Krause’s team counted up the differences in the TB bacterial genomes’ individual “letters,” or base pairs. Fewer differences means the genomes are more closely related.The genomes from the Peruvian mummies proved closest in sequence to a TB stain that infects marine mammals. That’s why Krause proposes that more than 1000 years ago, Peruvians hunting seals or sea lions caught TB from eating meat. The seals likely got the disease from some other unidentified animal in Africa and brought it across the ocean to South America, the researchers suggest. The seal-like TB bacterium was presumably replaced by a more virulent strain imported later by the Europeans, and it disappeared.The marine route is a plausible and convincing explanation,” says Stewart Cole, a microbiologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne. In a zoo, a tapir once caught TB from a seal, so it’s definitely possible, adds Thierry Wirth, who uses genomics to trace the history of infectious diseases at the National Museum of Natural History in Paris.But both say it’s not clear whether this was the only introduction in the Western Hemisphere. The microbes may still have crossed the Bering Strait in infected bison or people as well, Cole says. “It’s too big a jump to say all tuberculosis in South America is that young,” Donoghue adds. She and other researchers think that Krause needs to look for seal-like TB bacteria in more ancient American samples from more locations. The critics also question the timing of the origin of TB in humans, which upsets the latest thinking that the disease may have been with us for a 100,000 years, arguing that Krause and his colleagues need a better way to calibrate the mutation rate. Nevertheless, “this work opens up a number of new leads to be followed up on,” Gordon says.last_img read more

first_imgTOKYO—Japan’s ministry of education gave the country’s researchers something to cheer about today, announcing it was asking for a healthy 18% increase, to $11.1 billion, for science and technology spending in its proposed budget for the next fiscal year.”At least part of the increase is due to [Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s] administration’s support for innovation,” says Yoshiaki Ando, an official with the ministry’s research promotion bureau.The requested increase in spending goes virtually across the board. But in line with the innovation mantra, the proposal calls for a 53% increase, to $494 million, for a collection of new and continuing programs intended to help turn laboratory discoveries into new products and industries. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But there is also support for basic research. The ministry wants $2.4 billion, a 5.8% increase, for grants-in-aid for scientific research, which fund individuals and small groups at universities and research centers. Ando says that the increase covers new schemes to encourage interdisciplinary research and to help young researchers forge ties with researchers around the world. A budget line supporting a number of life science projects, including work on regenerative medicine and brain science, will rise 13.6% to $922 million. Particularly notable is increased support for big science facilities. A category covering upgrades to the SPring-8 synchrotron and the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex will go up 15.6% to $960 million. Separately, the ministry is asking for $54 million as Japan’s contribution for next year to the international Thirty Meter Telescope project, now entering the construction phase on Mauna Kea in Hawaii; $11 million in support for the Kamioka Gravitational wave detector, now under construction in central Japan; and $76 million to continue work on a next-generation information network linking Japan’s universities.       Government-wide S&T spending won’t be known until officials gather the requests from the various ministries. Ando says the total is likely to be shaved in coming negotiations with the Ministry of Finance, though “we’re going to try to keep these numbers.” The budget will be finalized and submitted to the legislature in December and take effect 1 April.last_img read more

first_imgThe power of anonymous comments—and the liability of those who make them—is at the heart of a possible legal battle embroiling PubPeer, an online forum launched in October 2012 for anonymous, postpublication peer review. A researcher who claims that comments on PubPeer caused him to lose a tenured faculty job offer now intends to press legal charges against the person or people behind these posts—provided he can uncover their identities, his lawyer says. The issue first came to light in August, when PubPeer’s (anonymous) moderators announced that the site had received a “legal threat.” Today, they revealed that the scientist involved is Fazlul Sarkar, a cancer researcher at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. Sarkar, an author on more than 500 papers and principal investigator for more than $1,227,000 in active grants from the U.S. National Institutes of Health, has, like many scientists, had his work scrutinized on PubPeer. More than 50 papers on which he is an author have received at least one comment from PubPeer users, many of whom point out potential inconsistencies in the papers’ figures, such as perceived similarities between images that are supposed to depict different experiments.Recently, PubPeer was contacted about those comments by Nicholas Roumel, an attorney at Nacht, Roumel, Salvatore, Blanchard & Walker P.C. in Ann Arbor, Michigan, who represents Sarkar and spoke to ScienceInsider on his behalf. On 9 June, the University of Mississippi Medical Center announced that Sarkar would join the faculty in its school of pharmacy. Records from a meeting of the Mississippi Board of Trustees of State Institutions of Higher Learning note that he was offered a tenured position and a salary of $350,000 per year, effective 1 July.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But on 19 June, Roumel says, Sarkar got a letter from the University of Mississippi revoking its offer. Science has not seen the letter, but Romel says that in his view, “it made it crystal clear the PubPeer postings were the reason they were rescinding the job offer.” A representative for the University of Mississippi declined to comment on the case, citing prospective employees’ confidentiality.According to Roumel, Wayne State allowed Sarkar to keep the position he had formally resigned but revoked his tenure. The events have “had a devastating effect on his career,” Roumel says. A representative of Wayne State confirmed that Sarkar is employed there but gave no details about any change in his status.Roumel says that because Sarkar suspects the person or persons who posted some of the PubPeer comments also circulated them to the University of Mississippi, as well as to colleagues in his department at Wayne State, he wants to find out their identities and file suit against them. One possible charge is defamation, Roumel says, because he believes several comments—some now removed by PubPeer’s moderators—stray from the facts to insinuate deliberate misconduct, in violation of PubPeer’s posting guidelines. Roumel has exchanged letters with PubPeer requesting the identity of the commenters, but no suits or request for a subpoena have been filed.PubPeer argues that researchers should defend their papers against online comments without resorting to legal action. “Authors have every opportunity to respond directly to any comments on PubPeer they feel are unjustified,” an anonymous PubPeer contact told ScienceInsider in an e-mail. Roumel’s response is that his client has no responsibility to critics who refuse to put a name to their accusations. “I don’t think he has any obligation to provide the data [behind the papers called into question] to anyone other than a journal,” he says.PubPeer’s own liability is a separate issue. If the site merely provided a forum for the comments and did not contribute to their content, as its moderators maintain, they would be immune from libel actions under a section of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, says Nicholas Jollymore, a libel lawyer at Jollymore Law Office P.C. in San Francisco, California, who represents PubPeer. But the effort to identify the commenters may involve a subpoena to PubPeer for information about it users, Roumel says.And although those who post comments have a right to anonymity under the First Amendment, “it’s by no means an absolute right,” says Alexander Abdo, a lawyer with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in New York City. They can lose this protection if there is a strong case of wrongdoing against them. “Whoever is trying to unmask someone needs to show that there is some likelihood of success of their claim,” Abdo says. He says the ACLU would work with Jollymore to defend PubPeer should Sarkar go forward with a lawsuit or subpoena.It’s not clear how much information a subpoena would yield. Users can create a PubPeer account using their e-mail address at an academic or research institution, but others submit “unregistered” comments through the site’s moderators. PubPeer may have names and e-mails for registered posters, but only IP addresses for the others. An Internet service provider may be able to look up who accesses the Internet from an IP address at a given time, Abdo says, but there are also ways to conceal one’s identity from such a search. Asked about possible wrongdoing by the PubPeer community, the moderators replied, “We will do everything possible to protect our users.”last_img read more