Peel unlocks plans for Salford Quays

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Bloomberg blossoms at City Gate

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Look no columns: glass and steel restructuring for Melrose House

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The skyline’s the limit

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Portfolio wraps up £40m spree

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Porto forward Marega walks off pitch after racist abuse

first_imgMarega later posted a message on Instagram calling the supporters who targeted him as “idiots” and also criticizing match referee Luis Godinho.”I’d also like to show my thanks to the referee who did not defend me and who gave me a yellow card for defending the color of my skin. I hope I never meet you on a soccer pitch ever again. You are a disgrace,” he added.The league’s organizing body Liga Portugal condemned the chants.”Liga Portugal does not agree and never will with acts of racism, xenophobia or intolerance that jeopardize the dignity of soccer players or any human beings,” said a statement on the organization’s website.”Liga Portugal will do everything to ensure that this episode and all other racist incidents do not go unpunished.”We believe this is a fight where your team’s colors do not matter and everyone must come together to eradicate this scourge on the game.”Porto’s director of communications Francisco Marques added on his own Twitter account: “Marega was fed up and left the pitch and Porto was forced to make a substitution due to racism.”Portuguese newspaper A Bola reported that no Porto players spoke to the media after the game in solidarity with Marega.Vitoria coach Ivo Vieira said he did not want to comment on the incident as he was not certain what had happened.”I prefer not to speak about a situation without being aware of all the facts. But if the player was provoked, then he should not have been,” he said.Porto is second in the Portuguese top flight, trailing leader Benfica by a point after 21 games. Topics : Porto coach Sergio Conceicao was eventually forced to substitute Marega in the 72nd minute.”We are completely indignant,” Conceicao told reporters.”They insulted Marega since the warm up. We are all a family here, regardless of our nationality, skin color, height or the color of our hair and we all deserve respect. What happened here is outrageous.”I know the fans here are very passionate about their club and many fans are not represented by some of the people who were in the crowd today.”center_img Porto striker Moussa Marega left the pitch in protest of being subject to racist insults during his side’s 2-1 win away to Vitoria Guimaraes in Portugal’s Primeira Liga on Sunday.The Mali forward, 28, scored what proved to be the winning goal in the 60th minute and celebrated the goal by pointing to his skin in response to a section of the home fans who had targeted him throughout the match.He was shown a yellow card for the reaction and after the abuse continued he tried to leave the pitch, pointing his thumbs down to the crowd, but was restrained by his team mates for a number of minutes.last_img read more

Man suspected of killing wife, three children in Australia car fire

first_imgAn ex-rugby league player is suspected of killing his three children and estranged wife by setting fire to their car, in what Australian police described as one of the most horrific incidents they have encountered.Police said a 31-year-old woman, named by local media as Hannah Baxter, died in a Brisbane hospital on Wednesday just hours after her three children aged three, four and six were found dead in the burned car on a suburban street.Her estranged husband, Rowan Baxter, who also died, allegedly approached the car and doused it with petrol before setting it alight, The Australian newspaper reported. The paper said that she jumped from the burning car and rolled on the ground, saying “He’s poured petrol on me”.Officials said she was rushed to hospital with severe burns following the “horrific” incident but later succumbed to her injuries.Public broadcaster ABC reported Baxter, a 42-year-old former Rugby League player for the New Zealand Warriors, was in the burning vehicle but got out and died on the footpath.Other reports said he died of a self-inflicted knife wound.  The tragedy led to an outpouring of grief on social media, with many calling for stronger action to address domestic violence. Natasha Stott Despoja, a former senator and chair of anti-violence group Our Watch, called violence against women in Australia a “national emergency”.”I know people want change, people are angry & sad today,” she tweeted. “How long before we stop this slaughter in our suburbs?”Police are treating the area in Brisbane’s inner east where the incident occurred as a crime scene but said it was too early to speculate on the cause of the fire.”How the fire actually occurred has not been ascertained at the moment,” Queensland Police detective inspector Mark Thompson said Wednesday.”For us to call it a murder-suicide or a tragic accident, it’s inappropriate for us to try to do that.””I’ve seen some horrific scenes. This is up there,” Thompson said.A passer-by who tried to intervene in the situation was also taken to hospital to be treated for facial burns, a Queensland Ambulance Service spokesperson said.”Somebody did step in to try and help that was close by,” he told reporters at the scene.”He was treated for some minor burns to his upper body. They’re not life-threatening.”The emergency services who responded to the scene have been stood down from their duties and will receive support, he added.Topics :last_img read more

Indonesian Embassy in Seoul suspends operations as COVID-19 cases rise

first_imgThe offices of the Indonesian Embassy and the Indonesian Investment Promotion Center (IIPC) in Seoul were temporarily closed on Friday amid concerns over the coronavirus following reports of a COVID-19 case in nearby Yeouido.The Indonesian Embassy complex and the IIPC office are located within a close radius from Yeouido, Seoul’s main investment and financial district, where an employee of state-run Export-Import Bank of Korea was found to have COVID-19 on Thursday, as reported by The Korea Herald.“The closure is only temporary, and it is to ensure a conducive service amid [the] outbreak of the [coronavirus], which has infected a victim within close radius to the Indonesian Embassy office,” Indonesian Ambassador to South Korea Umar Hadi said in a statement received by The Jakarta Post on Friday.  “This is also in line with [South Korea’s] policy to reduce the number of [people] meeting in the same place at the same time,” he went on to say.Read also: South Korea starts virus checks on 200,000-plus sect membersWith the office closure, public service counters for the handling of visas, passports and consular services in the embassy will be closed temporarily as employees are set to work from home during the closure.Extra safety measures and efforts to disinfect the Indonesian Embassy complex and the IIPC Seoul offices were ongoing, Umar said. The Yeouido case is among the latest to add to the rising number of coronavirus infections in South Korea, where 256 new cases were reported on Friday, bringing the total to 2,022 confirmed cases — the highest in the world outside China, AFP reported.The Indonesian Embassy, in cooperation with the COVID-19 task force, is still working at the Indonesian Embassy Command Post in Seoul and the Aju Command Post near Daegu — the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in South Korea — to protect Indonesians living in the East Asian country.In case of emergency, Indonesians are advised to call the Indonesian Embassy Command Post in Seoul at +82-10-5450-2181 or the Aju Command Post at +82-10-3601-9980. (gis)Topics :last_img read more

Court halts Jakarta’s plan to reopen ERP tenders

first_imgThe Jakarta State Administrative Court (PTUN) has ruled against the city administration in a lawsuit related to the procurement of the long-awaited electronic road pricing (ERP) system by ordering it to resume the ongoing tender process.Governor Anies Baswedan halted the tender process in August last year because of alleged maladministration and he planned to start the process from square one.This prompted a telecommunications infrastructure company, PT Bali Towerindo Sentra, which participated in the pre-bidding process, to file a lawsuit with the PTUN against the city administration in September last year, demanding the city revoke the cancellation. Read also: Despite numerous delays, ERP still feasible: ExpertJakarta Legal Bureau head Yayan Yuhana refused to comment on the ruling. “I haven’t read the verdict. I haven’t updated [my information],” she said, as quoted by kompas.com.The ERP system was first proposed to the administration in May 2005 to overcome acute traffic problems in the capital. Then-governor Sutiyoso said in 2007 the system would be a suitable replacement for the three-in-one car-sharing practice, which was deemed ineffective for easing congestion.The system, however, had experienced several setbacks over the decade because of multiple changes to provincial leadership.Governor Anies consulted with the Attorney General’s Office (AGO), asking for a legal opinion on alleged maladministration during the tender process. The AGO recommended the city administration cancel the bidding on the grounds that the “mechanism in the tender process is not in accord with requirements”.Two firms that received prequalification as potential vendors, Norwegian Q-Free and Swedish KapschTrafficCom, withdrew from the tendering, leaving one Indonesian company, PT Bali Towerindo Sentra, the only remaining potential vendor. The foreign firms supplied ERP technology during a trial in 2014.At the time, Q-Free said in a statement that its decision to withdraw “is a consequence of the continued uncertainty regarding the tendering timeline, project structure and financing and project profitability”. (nal)Topics : The PTUN ruled in favor of the company on Tuesday.“[The court] grants the plaintiff’s request for the administration, revoking a letter announcing the cancellation of the bidding process for the electronic road pricing system,” presiding judge M. Arif Pratomo said in the ruling, as published on the court’s website.The bench also restricted the Jakarta administration from calling for new tenders rather than resuming the ongoing process.”The defendant is prohibited from taking any actions […] that could cause loss for the plaintiff, such as reopening tenders for the electronic road pricing system,” according to the ruling.last_img read more

Italy overtakes China as nation with most virus deaths

first_imgItaly announced another 427 fatalities on Thursday, taking its total to 3,405, according to an AFP tally.China, where the outbreak first emerged in December last year, has officially reported 3,245 deaths.Globally, the death toll from the virus — whose main symptoms are a dry cough and fever — has risen to over 9,000.Countries have tightened border controls and unleashed nearly a trillion dollars to prop up the teetering world economy, only to see the once-in-a-century pandemic seemingly spiral further out of control. ‘Paying a big price’ US President Donald Trump, who has come under fire for his response to the crisis, charged Thursday that the world was paying for China’s lack of transparency on the outbreak of the new coronavirus there several months ago.”It could have been contained to that one area of China where it started. And certainly the world is paying a big price for what they did,” he said.As the toll surged in his country, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said the national lockdown, which has been copied around Europe, would be prolonged to April 3, shattering hopes of a quick end to the crisis. “We will not be able to return immediately to life as it was before,” he said.France also mooted extending the two-week lockdown ordered this week by President Emmanuel Macron, as the interior minister blasted “idiots” who flout home confinement rules and put others at risk.The disease continued to hit high-profile figures with EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier and Monaco’s Prince Albert II among those testing positive. Italy passed a grim milestone on Thursday when it overtook China as the country with most reported deaths from the new coronavirus sweeping the planet.The world has stepped up its war to try to contain the rapid spread of COVID-19, with several countries imposing lockdowns that are keeping tens of millions of people trapped in their homes.But the death toll has soared in Europe even as China saw a glimmer of hope with zero new domestic cases reported for the first time. ‘Enemy against humanity’ The battle is only just beginning across the rest of the world, with the shadow of the virus lengthening across Africa.The Nigerian mega-city of Lagos announced it would shut its schools while Burkina Faso confirmed the first death in sub-Saharan Africa.Russia reported its first death and even the Pacific nation of Fiji said it had its first case.The UN warned that as nations bring in shutdowns and travel bans, some three billion people lack even the most basic weapons to protect themselves from the virus: soap and running water.World Health Organization head Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus urged countries to “come together as one against a common enemy: an enemy against humanity”.Countries are taking increasingly drastic steps to stem infections, with Australia and New Zealand banning non-residents from arriving, and India imposing a one-day nationwide curfew.Britain closed dozens of London Underground stations and shut down schools, although the government denied reports it was about to lock down the capital. Bank bazooka With countries paralyzed by the pandemic and stock markets imploding, policymakers this week unleashed a wave of measures to shore up the global economy.The European Central Bank late Wednesday announced a 750-billion-euro bond-buying scheme, dubbed the “big bazooka”.”Extraordinary times require extraordinary action. There are no limits to our commitment to the euro,” ECB chief Christine Lagarde said.In the United States, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin is urging Congress to pass a $1-trillion emergency stimulus package immediately, with many economists saying the US is already now in deep recession.Trump has said he views himself as a “wartime president”, even as his administration faced growing criticism over a lack of testing for coronavirus and for the speed of its response.The US has so far shied away from the sweeping restrictions used in China and many European countries, although the streets of many of its major cities have emptied as local curbs come into effect.European and US stocks staged a rebound on the stimulus news, although Asian markets took another beating.But the sense of impending doom continues to cast a pall over the world economy with airlines, carmakers and others all warning of bleak times ahead.center_img China listed no new domestic infections for the first time since the outbreak first erupted in the central city of Wuhan in December, before spreading worldwide.It appeared to have staunched the virus with strict measures including a complete quarantine of Wuhan since January, meaning the number of infections and deaths in the rest of the world have surpassed those in China.But there were fears that Asia faces a second wave of cases imported from abroad, with 34 new cases reported in China, the highest figure for two weeks. ‘Like a psychosis’ While the EU has closed its borders to outsiders, in many countries bars, restaurants and most shops have closed their doors until further notice, bringing life in Europe’s normally bustling cities to a halt. The virus also continues to hit sports and cultural events, with Greece handing over the Olympic flame to Tokyo 2020 organizers at a ceremony held behind closed doors amid calls for the games to be postponed.English football also extended its shutdown  until at least April 30.Interpol warned that criminals around the world were cashing in on the pandemic by offering fake or sub-standard medical products like surgical masks.Countries are also working to combat hoarding.As others stockpiled toilet paper and pasta, the French are thronging bakeries for their famed baguettes.”We’ve seen people come in who want to buy 50 baguettes at a time,” said Matthieu Labbe of France’s Federation of Bakeries. “There’s something like a psychosis in some people,”  Topics :last_img read more